33 – Reaching the unreached: putting equity at the heart of immunisation

in page functions

This special session convened representatives from governments, multilateral agencies, civil society, and the private sector to discuss best practices for achieving equity in immunisation and health

UNI42351 copyF

Copyright UNICEF/2005/Indrias Getachew

This special session convened representatives from governments, multilateral agencies, civil society, and the private sector to discuss best practices for achieving equity in immunisation and health.

Dr. Moeti from the WHO opened the session and noted that equity is at the heart of WHO’s mandate and will continue to be part of the post-2015 agenda.

Helen Evans provided a brief overview of how GAVI understands equity from the gender, wealth, and geographic perspectives, and how GAVI is addressing it.

Simon Wright of Save the Children pointed out that the in countries that have high immunisation coverage, engaging communities and community-based organisation has been a key strategy. Moreover, he made the point that immunisation was the flagship for extension of universal healthcare.

Dr. Edmundo Sanchez Cruz from the Ministry of Health in Nicaragua recounted Nicaragua’s experiences in achieving health equity, highlighting the political will to finance immunisation and health services. He also underscored the importance of engaging communities as independent partners.

Adding a pharmaceutical industry perspective, Christophe Weber spoke of GSK’s differential pricing model and stressed the need for research to be funded to develop vaccines for countries that need them.

Finally, Faruque Ahmed spoke of the importance of government-civil society partnerships in advancing equity in Bangladesh and emphasised the power that grassroots organisations such as BRAC in mobilising communities.

Key messages that were highlighted in this session included the strong social and economic rationale for ensuring equity in health and immunisation, and the value of partnerships between different stakeholders to tackle some of the barriers to achieving it.

The session also emphasised the need for national frameworks for local action.

168 million

GAVI-supported vaccine campaigns have resulted in 100 million individuals being immunised against meningitis A and 68 million against yellow fever since 2000.

Meningitis A Conjugate Vaccine Immunizaton Campaign. Joint WHO/UNICEF 2011 Progress Report: January to December 2012. March 2013, p.3 | 2011 data. Yellow Fever Initiative. Joint WHO and UNICEF 2011 Progress Report Nov 2012, p.13, 15. 2012 data: Based on data from Epidemiology of Yellow Fever in the African Region: 2012 report. WHO Regional Office for Africa. April 2013, p.6.

More facts...

close icon

modal window here