29 – The new new vaccines: what vaccines could be coming your way in the next 5-7 years?

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Speakers presented the status of several vaccines that are priorities in many developing countries, such as HIV and TB, and discussed the status of two vaccines which the GAVI Board has already indicated specific interest in: malaria and cholera

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Copyright GAVI/2007/Edy Purnomo

Speakers presented the status of several vaccines that are priorities in many developing countries, such as HIV and TB, and discussed the status of two vaccines which the GAVI Board has already indicated specific interest in: malaria and cholera.

They explored not only the status of R&D and clinical trials, but also potential costs, feasibility and challenges related to introduction of these vaccines to developing countries.

Speakers emphasised the huge potential of these vaccines to improve global public health and to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. IAVI said that despite an HIV vaccine potentially being too early for the next GAVI Vaccine Investment Strategy, a vaccine is essential as “the only way to truly end this epidemic” that results in 7,000 new HIV infections daily. 

AERAS shared the encouraging news that there are also 13 vaccine candidates in clinical trials at present for TB.

Exciting developments from global efforts to develop a malaria vaccine were presented by the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative. Results from a ground-breaking phase three clinical trial conducted in 11 sites across 7 countries in Africa have already shown efficacy over 50%, although efficacy is lower in younger ages and may vary across some regions due to variations in transmission rates.

In the context of recent cholera epidemics in Haiti and Zimbabwe, an update from the largest ever feasibility study for the Shanchol vaccine was provided by ICDDR,B.

Firdausi Qadri also highlighted the development of a stockpile for oral cholera vaccine as “extremely positive, especially with the potential of further GAVI funding to help use these vaccines in countries where they are desperately needed.” 

The session concluded with an overview of the 2013 Vaccine Investment Strategy process that is being led by the GAVI Alliance.

The presentation included the key steps and types of criteria anticipated to be used in prioritising future vaccines for GAVI investments.

Nina Schwalbe ended by saying that “we now have new data such as updated DALY estimates that we can include this time. Comprehensive analyses coupled with our consultation process will ensure we bring concrete recommendations to the GAVI Board for decision in December 2013.”

168 million

GAVI-supported vaccine campaigns have resulted in 100 million individuals being immunised against meningitis A and 68 million against yellow fever since 2000.

Meningitis A Conjugate Vaccine Immunizaton Campaign. Joint WHO/UNICEF 2011 Progress Report: January to December 2012. March 2013, p.3 | 2011 data. Yellow Fever Initiative. Joint WHO and UNICEF 2011 Progress Report Nov 2012, p.13, 15. 2012 data: Based on data from Epidemiology of Yellow Fever in the African Region: 2012 report. WHO Regional Office for Africa. April 2013, p.6.

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